Tag Archives: science


The Asexual Spectrum: Identities In The Ace Community

The Asexual Spectrum: Identities In The Ace Community

Extremely busy with school at the moment, but hopefully you have seen the Huffington Post’ssix-part series on asexuality,” which features some excellent resources for anyone interested in learning more about asexuality. For now, enjoy this awesome infographic! Preview text from the Huff:

“Aces say that asexuality, like sexuality, exists on a spectrum. Most asexuals, when asked, will identify two orientations: a sexual one and a romantic one.

“‘[The asexual lifestyle] allows you to see how sex and romance can be decoupled,’ said Anthony Bogaert, a professor at Canada’s Brock University and an authority on asexual research. ‘It allows you to see that when we automatically couple up romance and sex, as if they’re naturally together, that’s not true.'”


“Love Without Sex” Web Interview/Discussion

Originally aired November 26, 2012, this Huffington Post web interview discusses asexuality from a very honest and layperson viewpoint. There are no aggressive arguments here, and I think it would make a great resource to share with family and friends. You can view and post comments as well. Hosted by Janet Varney.

Guests include:
David Jay (San Francisco, CA), Founder, AVEN
Maddox (San Francisco, CA), LGBT Advocate and Educator
CJ Chasin (Windsor, Canada), Ph.D. Student in Applied Social Psychology, University of Windsor
Angela Tucker (Brooklyn, NY), Documentary Filmmaker

The webpage also cites an interesting resource: “Does Asexuality Fall Under the Queer Umbrella?” by Allison Hope, PR specialist and journalist, May 16, 2012. I think this particular matter is going to come up more and more as asexuality permeates into LGBT issues. It may take a while, but we’ll get there.

On a related matter, the (A)sexual documentary is now available in the USA on Netflix, according to Jeremy44 of AVEN. Click here to view the forum thread.

Back from a librarian vacation of sorts…

I apologize for the long gap in posts here, I have been busy working full-time (finally!) and studying for my master’s program in library science, and I did realize from the get-go that I wasn’t the best blogger… Surely we have some new ace webpages out there now, from the time Bogaert’s book was published (August) to Christmas. Speaking of which, I hope everyone’s holiday(s) have been just wonderful! I have yet another four-day weekend before me for New Year’s so I will be catching up on some reading and will hopefully have some reviews for you very soon.

AVEN Homepage

By now you have most certainly seen the updated design for AVEN (which may look a bit like my idea: “Proposed Idea for AVEN Website Re-design”?) that definitely brings the site together much better than before. I have found a couple broken links, such as the “Learn More” button when accessed from the Forums homepage, and the link to Comments (“Updated 28 Dec · 0 comments”) from a user’s profile page. Nevertheless, I think the design is well on its way to utilizing AVEN to its fullest extent. Feel free to respond here about the AVEN upgrade.

Another topic I wanted to address is AsexualNews.com. Most sites in the asexual community are personal sites such as blogs or Tumblrs. Whether you consider yourself a member of the asexual community, how would rate the news on AsexualNews.com? Where do you get your asexual news, if you seek it out at all? AVEN forum thread regarding this issue: “What is Your Opinion of AsexualNews.com?”

Interview with Anthony Bogaert

Another AVEN Digest link, Storm Watch: The Mystery of Sexual Attraction — and Asexuality interviews author of Understanding Asexuality, Anthony Bogaert. Bogaert gives a nice introduction, which is great press for the asexual community. I’m very pleased that he has published this book, forever placing us a real orientation in academia. Enjoy!

Asexual Prejudice?

Here is a recent article, “Prejudice Against ‘Group X’ (Asexuals)” by Gordon Hodson and posted on AVEN Digest Oc.t 8, which I think would quite interesting to follow up on, as Hodson mentions near the end of his article. He also lists some good references and further readings at the bottom of the page, which includes two of Bogaert’s articles. I will be following up with a review of Bogaert’s book as soon as I finish it. I purchased the Kindle edition for about $28.

I also found a Bundlr page: An Introduction to Asexuality which has links to some good references, especially for “101” materials. Just had to share!

Proposed Idea for AVEN Website Re-design

Designed by the Asexual Librarian.

When I was compiling my blogroll here, I was able to take in how different asexual websites provide different media or a unique perspective. On this blog, the links are cataloged for the mere convenience of the reader, but I have also collected them for the purpose of research.

Part of library and information science is to not only know how to access information but also how understand its organization. Thus I am proposing a new design for the AVEN website.

AVEN currently states on its front page that it is in part “a large archive of resources on asexuality.” Therefore, why not make it a more centralized location for all of the ace material currently available on the Web? By that, I mean containing access to blogs, media, academic research, psychological studies, discussions, news, visibility, activism, wiki changes, forum posts, pride information, etc., many of which I found on various online sources.

It’s valuable to have the diversity and intellectual freedom that the internet provides us with, however, AVEN was intended to collect much of this and has not kept up with updating it. While that is a daunting task, it is a necessity for newcomers in the community, as well as for the professionals we are trying to establish a report with. AVEN has so many members, many of whom create new forum threads to try to find said asexuality information that has not been properly cataloged. I am proposing a home page design which can be set up by media or subject type.

First of all, this is merely a mockup, an example. I did not experiment with the fonts or any design beyond that of the basic placement of items around the page. It’s simply an idea, and nothing else. (So please do not focus on the lack of detail; it’s not the important part.)

I tried to organize information into a logic setup, including links on the home page that are not currently accessible from there. I expanded this menu on the left side of the page to show how I might organize (and add) various sub-pages of AVEN. I added a few more ideas even though I realize much of the text on AVEN has not been edited in a long while.

As for the home page content, under each heading, I used some filler text and inserted some examples of appropriate links that are already out there, such as including the latest post from The Asexual Sexologist under Research. These are just simple examples off the top of my head.

On the overall design level, I thought the asexual flag would help reinforce the importance of the asexual community via symbolism. I wanted to find something more updated and interactive, for asexuals and non-asexuals alike. And this is merely an example, so mind you, all the text is filler. We are able to place any news or information here that would benefit the community. There is much more we could do.

(A)sexual Film Review

I just had a chance to watch this film and wanted to submit some feedback for the community.

The documentary opens with people trying to describe a definition for asexuality, which often turned into the “asexual reproduction” we see in the animal kingdom. Their views are also interspersed throughout the film for definitions on “a relationship,” “love,” etc.

Featured are some of the common misconceptions of asexuality, which is still necessary to more fully explain the concept to those who are unfamiliar with it. We see David Jay trying to inform people about asexuality at a San Francisco Pride, a nonsexual couple enter into marriage, and even a brief clip of Janeane Garofalo doing standup and identifying as asexual. I think the documentary is very gratifying for other asexuals, who see it reinforced that they’re not alone, and that they can show this film to family, friends, and scholars for further recognition if they so choose.

The film also featured psychologists who had researched asexuality or self-identified asexuals and found nothing psychologically wrong with them because of their asexuality, which is always a great feeling. The professionals interviewed include (listed in no particular order):

  1. Lori Brotto, Associate Professor, Department of Gynecology, University of British Columbia
  2. Anthony F. Bogaert, Professor of Community Health Services and Psychology, Brock College (or Brock University)
  3. Cynthia Graham, Clinical Psychologist, The Kinsey Institute
  4. Carol Queen, Sexologist, Founder, Center for Sex and Culture
  5. Dan Savage, Sex Columnist, who sunk to the level of the women on The View. He basically stated that there was no reason for visibility if there’s no sex happening. But I suppose it’s always necessary to at least supply the opponent’s viewpoint.

The film also featured some individuals in the asexual community, such as David Jay, Swank Ivy, and a few others, both young and old, who risked possible embarrassment of any intimate details for the sake of asexual visibility. To me, it seemed like it was all very much worth it. People need to know that it’s perfectly normal to not desire sex. Swank Ivy seems to be getting along just fine on her own. David Jay shared with us a deeply personal story that I think reaches further to suggest that we are all very much fluid in all of our identities and orientations: romantic, sexual, gender, etc. We change, we grow, we learn; it’s all a part of life. The most important point from all of this, I think, is that we are all able to identify ourselves however we choose.

Overall, a great film and definitely worth getting out there more!

(A)sexual is available at iTunes for $14.99 or Amazon.com.

(A)sexual at Arts Engine, Inc. (includes trailer) and Big Mouth Films.

Understanding Asexuality by Anthony F. Bogaert Released Aug. 16

Link to Amazon.com: Understanding Asexuality by Anthony F. Bogaert

Andrew from the Asexuality Studies mailing list tells us, “Tony Bogaert’s book *Understanding Asexuality* came out today.  I’ve purchased the Kindle version, and so far it’s been an interesting read and I highly recommend it to everyone interested in studying asexuality.  It’s intended as something as a cross between an academic and popular book, such that it should be quite accessible to non-academics (and academics from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds), while still being of interest to people studying asexuality specifically and human sexuality more generally.”

It sounds good so I’m going to purchase a Kindle edition and let you know how it is!

(Sorry this is a little late, but I just started working a second job so I have a lot less free time on my hands!)

The Dewey Decimal Number

According to Dewey.info, the only Dewey Decimal number I could find so far for asexuality in particular is 571.8429: “Asexual reproduction–microorganisms” and “Reproduction by asexual spores” is 571.847. This of course applies to “reproduction and growth of cells” (science) as opposed to a human sexual orientation (social science). Another page of the same source lists “sexual orientation, transgenderism, intersexuality” as 306.76, which would should include information about any sexual orientation, as the umbrella 306.7 is “sexual relations.” This is just a general thought for later exploration, but perhaps we see can expect to see asexuality materials in our libraries under 306.76 someday soon!